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 sword rust
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Claudia
Forum Student

United Kingdom
42 Posts

Posted - 26 Jul 2010 :  00:17:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Only a couple of months after purchase my sword has begun to rust quite badly. I got most of it off with a file and steel wool, but am wondering:
a) is this a material fault or am I doing something wrong? I keep it in the hilt when not in use and I certainly don't store it outside!
b) is there anything I can do to prevent further damage?

Claudia

bruno
Master Chat Remedy

United Kingdom
279 Posts

Posted - 26 Jul 2010 :  05:39:19  Show Profile  Click to see bruno's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Keep it in a scabbard, wipe it down after each session and be sure to oil it regularly.

Bruno Nicoletti
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Shieldwall
Topic Master

Cyprus
140 Posts

Posted - 26 Jul 2010 :  09:23:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Its unfortuante but its true of all metal gear you will end up using. Bruno is right though, keep a thin sheen of oil on it at all times when not in use, Ballistol Oil works pretty well for me and its the one that Albion Swords reccomends too so start out with that. Furthermore keep your metal kit (swords etc.) someplace with as little humidity as possible, down here its more of a problem than it is in the UK but still sound advice as its a sneaky introducer of corrosion.
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Claudia
Forum Student

United Kingdom
42 Posts

Posted - 26 Jul 2010 :  11:39:55  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ah, oil it, of course! DOH, should have thought of it. I'll also keep it out of the bathroom...;)

Claudia
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Alan E
Topic Master

520 Posts

Posted - 27 Jul 2010 :  09:18:57  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's why I have newspaper scabbards on mine - make by binding paper over the sword, put back on after oiling and it lightly oils the sword whilst protecting it from sweaty training gear (and protecting training gear from the sword of course). Not all woods or leather treatments are good for steel so sometimes the scabbard with a sword isn't the best place to store it, Certainly I've seen less rust on my training blunts since keeping them this way in the training bag.

Oh, and probably best to keep it out of the bathroom (or training bag), yes :D .
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Shieldwall
Topic Master

Cyprus
140 Posts

Posted - 27 Jul 2010 :  10:04:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Unless there's some kind of Lady of the Lake issue that we should be made aware of :)
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Mark B
Forum Master

United Kingdom
515 Posts

Posted - 27 Jul 2010 :  13:58:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yep, oil.

I like Alans make shift paper solution, it's seems to work pretty well with his swords.

Ultimately, while it may look unsightly, a little rust wont cause any issues with the performance of the blade though.

However, from a training point of view, the less rust on a weapon the better since theres is an increased risk of Tetinous (sp?) with rust if you get any cuts or nicks.

M


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Claudia
Forum Student

United Kingdom
42 Posts

Posted - 27 Jul 2010 :  18:56:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You mean tetanus? (You spell it like you pronounce it.) Never knew rust increased the risk of it. Will check that out.

Claudia
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Claudia
Forum Student

United Kingdom
42 Posts

Posted - 27 Jul 2010 :  18:58:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'll think about the paper solution, have to have a look next time you come for training, Alan!

PS: No lady of the lake issues,as far as I a'm aware ;)

Claudia
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Claudia
Forum Student

United Kingdom
42 Posts

Posted - 27 Jul 2010 :  20:16:18  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Actually, unless you bury your sword in the ground or use it as a garden tool, the chances of getting tetanus from it are rather remote, IMO. In this day and age where we all fence indoors, I can't quite picture any tetanus bacteria contaminating the equipment. Phew! One worry less...

Claudia
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spike
Forum Master

United Kingdom
753 Posts

Posted - 27 Jul 2010 :  21:57:59  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
apparently, English archers used to put their arrows in buckets of urine before a battle and often put them in the ground before shooting them. This led to the French accusing them of biological warfare! (lots of Frenchmen died of blood poisoning after being wounded by English arrows).
I normally give mine an occasional rub over with wire wool and a squirt of wd40, this works pretty well on my swords too :0

Si vis pacem, para bellum!.

Fortius quo fidelius.

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Mark B
Forum Master

United Kingdom
515 Posts

Posted - 03 Aug 2010 :  13:24:26  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tetanus (thanks for the SP correction), I thought was increased by the presence or Iron Oxide i.e. rust.

Who knows, I do physics not biology

Either way, rust will almost certainly increase the risk of something i'm sure, i'm sure my Dad can clarify. I dont think it's that big a deal though.

M


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Mark B
Forum Master

United Kingdom
515 Posts

Posted - 03 Aug 2010 :  15:18:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
From Wiki Re: Tetanus.

Looks like I, like so many others have just always associated Tetanus with rusty stuff. Clearly theres alot more to it:


Tetanus is often associated with rust, especially rusty nails, but this concept is somewhat misleading. Objects that accumulate rust are often found outdoors, or in places that harbor anaerobic bacteria, but the rust itself does not cause tetanus nor does it contain more C. tetani bacteria. The rough surface of rusty metal merely provides a prime habitat for a C. tetani endospore to reside, and the nail affords a means to puncture skin and deliver endospore into the wound. An endospore is a non-metabolising survival structure that begins to metabolise and cause infection once in an adequate environment. Because C. tetani is an anaerobic bacterium, it and its endospores survive well in an environment that lacks oxygen. Hence, stepping on a nail (rusty or not) may result in a tetanus infection, as the low-oxygen (anaerobic) environment is provided by the same object which causes a puncture wound, delivering endospores to a suitable environment for growth.

M

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